Videography for Beginners

Have you ever wondered how your favourite filmmakers create movies? Or how about having an idea for a video project, but not sure if your skills can do it justice? Here at Loud Crowd we have some basic tips for videography. Now, quiet on set please – we’re rolling in 3, 2, 1… ACTION!

Videography for Beginnings
Strategy at loudcowd

Horizontal Filming

switch from vertical to horizontal depending on what the subject matter calls for.

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Steady Shots

use a tripod to reduce shakiness

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Shot List

types of shots you want to capture while filming

Film shoot for Tuneless Documentary, in Balby, Doncaster

Videography Tips for Beginners

Due to the many innovations in technology, everyone can become an amateur videographer without breaking the bank on costly equipment.

All smartphones have the ability to shoot video, and there are plenty of free software systems available for editing. It’s possible to film a movie whenever you want nowadays.

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Horizontal Filming

This may seem simple, but many beginner videographers hold their phone exactly as they would when shooting still photos — and switch from vertical to horizontal depending on what the subject matter calls for.

However, with video, you cannot have a finished product that flips from portrait to the horizontal and back again. If you’re wondering why, consider this: how many movies have you seen in theatres that use a vertical shot?

Stephen Videographer and Content Writer

Steady Shots

For stable shots, use a tripod to reduce shakiness, although for moving shots, consider using a dolly, which is a small, wheeled platform meant for holding cameras while shooting

Shot List

Consider making a list of the types of shots you want to capture while filming — include some moving shots, but keep in mind that too much movement can be a bad thing.

Key Points

  • Always film horizontally.
  • Use a tripod or dolly for increased stability.
  • Vary your shots, and remember that too much movement can be a bad thing.
  • Give your people enough headspace.
  • Ignore your photographer instincts (but only in some ways).

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